NESS Main Site  |  NESS 2020 Virtual  |  Past & Future Meetings
New England Surgical Society

Back to 2021 Posters


Seroprevalence of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies, associated epidemiological factors and antibody kinetics among healthcare workers in Connecticut
Pavlos Papasavas1, Sope Olugbile2, Ulysses Wu3, Kenneth Robinson4, Amity Roberts5, David O"Sullivan6, Tara McLaughlin1, Jeff Mather6, Adam Steinberg7, Rocco Orlando7, Ajay Kumar8
1Surgery, Hartford Hospital, Hartford, Connecticut, United States, 2Cancer Institute, Hartford Hospital, Hartford, Connecticut, United States, 3Administration, Hartford Healthcare, Hartford, Connecticut, United States, 4Emergency Medicine, Hartford Hospital, Hartford, Connecticut, United States, 5Clinical Laboratory Services, Hartford Hospital, Hartford, Connecticut, United States, 6Research Program, Hartford Hospital, Hartford, Connecticut, United States, 7Medical Affairs, Hartford Healthcare, Hartford, Connecticut, United States, 8Clinical Affairs, Hartford Healthcare, Hartford, Connecticut, United States

Objective(s): Healthcare workers (HCWs) are at the front line of the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. Evaluating SARS-CoV-2 seroprevalence among HCWs could help identify the impact that epidemiological factors have on immune response to the infection over time. We sought to determine the seroprevalence of SARS-CoV-2 specific antibodies among HCWs, identify associated epidemiological factors and study antibody kinetics. Design: Longitudinal evaluation of seroprevalence and epidemiology of SARS-CoV-2 specific antibodies in HCWs. Setting: large healthcare system in Connecticut. Patients: HCWs included all staff involved in providing any level of care to patients. Interventions: Consented study participants were invited to schedule three appointments for blood draws at the initial visit, at 2-4 weeks, and at approximately 6 months after the initial visit. Main Outcome Measures: Prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibodies and antibody kinetics. Results: The baseline prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 antibody among 6,863 HCWs was 6.3% (95% CI: 5.7%- 6.9%) and was highest among patient care support (16.7%), medical assistants (9.1%), and nurses (8.2%) and lower for physicians (3.8%) and advanced practice providers (4.5%). Seroprevalence was significantly higher among African Americans compared to Caucasians (OR 3.26, 95% CI 1.77-5.99), in participants with at least one COVID symptom (OR 3.00, 95% CI 1.92-4.68), and in those reporting prior quarantine (OR 3.83, 95% CI 2.57-5.70). No symptoms were reported in 24% of the seropositive participants. Among the 47% who returned for a follow-up serology test, the seroreversion rate was 39.8% and the seroconversion rate was 2.2%. The incidence of reinfection in the seropositive group was zero. Conclusions: Although there is a decline in the IgG antibody signal over time, 60.2% of the seropositive HCWs maintain their seroconversion status at 6 months.


Back to 2021 Posters